A 19th century estate restored in Tagansky District

May 6
Construction and renovation

A major restoration of the 19th century estate’s main building was completed in Tagansky District. The building at 9/3 Goncharnaya Street, Bldg. 1 has been identified as a cultural heritage site. All the work was monitored by Moscow’s Department of Cultural Heritage. The comprehensive restoration project lasted about two years.

“Major conservation work was carried out and completed on the main building in the city estate on the corner of Goncharnaya Street and Ryumin Pereulok before the coronavirus restrictions were introduced. The conservation engineers enhanced the facades and the interior of the building. I would add that the main building has a small adjoining house which was restored in 2017 under the One Rouble per Square Metre rental discount programme. As a result, the entire estate has been given back its authentic look,” says Alexei Yemelyanov, head of Moscow’s Department of Cultural Heritage.

In the course of the work, old layers of paint and plaster were stripped off the facades, the brickwork was repaired, and all defects were rectified including cracks and chips. The building was then replastered and given a fresh coat of paint, with all the surfaces treated with protective coatings.

Special attention was given to the gracious stucco décor of the facades – architraves, rusticated vanes and stay braces, cornices and graphic rustication grooves. Also, specialists renovated the building’s roofing, windows and doors.

Moulded elements were restored and renovated in the interior – columns, plafonds, rosettes, fielded panels, friezes, cartouches and swags. The brick vaults of the basement were returned to their  historic appearance.  The 19th century staircases were fixed up, including the main staircase with its ornamented metal balustrade and wooden handrails.

The systematic pattern of the estate on this site was first set out in 1786 when the property was owned by titular councillor V. Voyeikov. A wooden main house and outbuildings appeared on the red line of Yauzskaya Street (currently Verkhnyaya Radishchevsckaya Street). There were also small buildings facing the lane (pereulok) and the passage to Shvivaya (Vshivaya Gorka) Hill (currently Goncharnaya Street). By the early 20th century the wooden outbuildings were replaced with stone ones. 

The two-storied stone building, (part of modern Building 1) with a wooden gallery along the courtyard façade, was erected on the site in 1818. In 1865, the estate’s main building was rebuilt. The courtyard wall, the wooden gallery and a part of the outbuilding were dismantled while the house was expanded. The layout and the interior which we can see today dates back to precisely that period. 

In the early 20th century the owner, farmer Ivan Nikitin and his family, lived on the estate. The main building was entirely residential.

Source: mos.ru

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