The Alexei Morozov collection: Porcelain, ceramics and glass at Kuskovo Museum Estate | Events | Moscow Seasons
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January 25October 14

The Alexei Morozov collection: Porcelain, ceramics and glass at Kuskovo Museum Estate

The exhibition “The Alexei Morozov Collection: Porcelain, Ceramics, Glass” will open in the Grand Stone Greenhouse at the Kuskovo Museum Estate on 25 January.

For the first time, most of the porcelain collection that belonged to Alexei Morozov (1857–1934) – Russian porcelain, ceramics and glass – will be exhibited. This will include the main part of the collections of the State Museum of Ceramics that was moved to the Kuskovo Museum Estate in 1932. In the 1920s–1930s, other private collections were added, but Alexei Morozov’s collection remains the largest.

Photos and sketches of the collector as well as archive documents will be shown. Excerpts from his diary and a book with a scientific description of the collection by Morozov are especially interesting.

Russian porcelain and Swiss cabinet stained-glass panes 

The largest section of the exhibition is dedicated to Russian porcelain. There will be a retrospective of 18th and 19th century Russian porcelain from Morozov’s collection: masterpieces from the Imperial Porcelain Factory and porcelain from the largest factories such as Gardner, Popov, Batenin, Safronov and the Kornilovs as well as rare items from lesser-known makers.

In addition, the exhibition will include a collection of porcelain plastics, from early sculptures made at the Imperial and Gardner plants to signature items by early 20th century artists.

The collections of ceramics and glass have high artistic value. Visitors will also be able to see rare faience and Majolica sculptures and items made by the Imperial Kiev-Mezhigorod Plant and the best private factories that belonged to Auerbach, Poskochin, the Terekhovs and Kiselyov.

A small glass collection fully represents the key stages in the development of glasswork. Visitors will be able to see items from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries, in addition to several items produced abroad, such as Swiss stained glass panes dating from the late 16th – the first quarter of the 17th century.

The exhibition will be open through 14 October.

The exhibition “The Alexei Morozov Collection: Porcelain, Ceramics, Glass” will open in the Grand Stone Greenhouse at the Kuskovo Museum Estate on 25 January.

For the first time, most of the porcelain collection that belonged to Alexei Morozov (1857–1934) – Russian porcelain, ceramics and glass – will be exhibited. This will include the main part of the collections of the State Museum of Ceramics that was moved to the Kuskovo Museum Estate in 1932. In the 1920s–1930s, other private collections were added, but Alexei Morozov’s collection remains the largest.

Photos and sketches of the collector as well as archive documents will be shown. Excerpts from his diary and a book with a scientific description of the collection by Morozov are especially interesting.

Russian porcelain and Swiss cabinet stained-glass panes 

The largest section of the exhibition is dedicated to Russian porcelain. There will be a retrospective of 18th and 19th century Russian porcelain from Morozov’s collection: masterpieces from the Imperial Porcelain Factory and porcelain from the largest factories such as Gardner, Popov, Batenin, Safronov and the Kornilovs as well as rare items from lesser-known makers.

In addition, the exhibition will include a collection of porcelain plastics, from early sculptures made at the Imperial and Gardner plants to signature items by early 20th century artists.

The collections of ceramics and glass have high artistic value. Visitors will also be able to see rare faience and Majolica sculptures and items made by the Imperial Kiev-Mezhigorod Plant and the best private factories that belonged to Auerbach, Poskochin, the Terekhovs and Kiselyov.

A small glass collection fully represents the key stages in the development of glasswork. Visitors will be able to see items from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries, in addition to several items produced abroad, such as Swiss stained glass panes dating from the late 16th – the first quarter of the 17th century.

The exhibition will be open through 14 October.

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